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Dysfunctional Family Winery Launches Online

Dysfunctional Family Winery Launches Online

The launch of Dysfunctional Family Winery:

Exclusively for our blog post readers, in time for the winter holidays, Dysfunctional Family Winery announces the launch of our online presence – providing our blog subscribers with the first opportunity to purchase our wines.

Subscribers are being offered an instant 20% discount on all orders for the holidays. If you are reading this, you are very likely already subscribed!

Ready to shop? Click on this link:

Choose your wines, then enter this code for an instant 20% off: hydeout

The story of the Dysfunctional Family Winery:

It’s a simple premise – “we take our wine seriously, but not ourselves”. For decades we built and farmed vineyards and produced the wines for many noteworthy private clients – from Silicon Valley to Sonoma. From this experience we developed our vision for our winery. And now we invite you to taste our family’s wines, visit our ranch, and feel at home, relaxed, and ready for fun. That’s why we named our winery after all of our wonderful families – happily, humorously, proudly Dysfunctional!

Smarty Mockup

Mock-up created for smartymockups.com

The proposed Dysfunctional Family Winery building:

Hard at work for over three years with engineers and Sonoma County on the permit process, we hope to be under construction soon on our winery building. The plan is to create a modest but state of the art building – where we will produce several wines – our flagship wine an Estate Reserve made primarily from our Umbrian red Sagrantino fruit, blended in with a few percents of estate Syrah, Petite Sirah, and Cabernet, the tasty and affordable Red Blend, the juicy and racy Rosé, and a few specially chosen client wines as well.

Why “Dysfunctional?” In a contrarian twist – it’s not finance. Not strategy. Not Technology. It is teamwork that remains the ultimate competitive advantage both because it is so powerful and so rare.

The barn at Hydeout Sonoma

Before: the winery building as it sits today, an old 50’s-era barn. Not much to it and sadly not much worth preserving. We did our homework and there just isn’t any historical value. But we’ll be saving as much of the interior wood framing and wood siding as possible. The floor is mostly dirt and broken concrete. The two palm trees in front and the big oak in back will remain.

 

Dysfunctional Family Winery

After: This is the winery engineer’s “artist rendering” of the proposed winery building. A crush pad and large rollup door to the east allows for easy transit of fruit and juice into the building. A small south-facing patio offers views of the Sagrantino vineyard. Winery guests will enter through the opposite end of the building on the west side (not shown here).

Remember: click on this link and use the coupon code ‘hydeout’ for instant 20% savings on all orders.

Ken Winemaker

We look forward to answering your questions about all of our wines. Sometime soon we will invite our customers to visit the new winery and hang out at the ranch and join in our curated event schedules. Sincerely – Ken Wornick and the entire Dysfunctional Family Winery staff.

The smoky grape harvest of Sonoma 2020

The smoky grape harvest of Sonoma 2020

A smoky harvest like no other…

Pandemic, wildfires, smoke, and riots. And who can forget the electromagnetic solar pulse that destroyed the electrical grid! While all this mayhem has been going on, the Sonoma wine industry has been grappling with a grape harvest like no other.

While firefighters fought blazes across the west, growers attempted to protect their employees from the virus with masks, thermometers, and testing while also protecting the valuable grape crop from endless exposure to smoke. The compounds from smoke can settle on the grapes and be metabolized into the fruit through the grape skins. In some wines, the effect will be little to none and the smoke is no cause for worry. In other cases, experts and trained consumers will detect the smoke taint in the wine after 6 months or so. Behind the scenes, most winemakers are saying that the frequency of smoke taint is overblown. We’re just not seeing detectable levels as wines complete fermentation. But no one wants to be caught pressing a narrative that could appear to be self-serving. Click here to read a detailed story on smoke taint from noted SF Chronicle wine writer Esther Mobley and this article by noted chemist Clark Smith.

Here are some photos of Hydeout Sonoma’s first few days of the smoky harvest:

Bringing in the fruit:

We managed to bring in great fruit despite the many challenges, and thankfully most of it looks to be free of smoke taint. But we won’t really know for sure until a few months from now when a) the lab test results are back and b) the wine is safely in barrels.

Processing the fruit:

This time-lapse video link below says it all: Click here for the time lapse video of the winery crush pad.  Note that each white bin that arrives and departs represents a half-ton of fruit, equal to about 80 gallons or 35 cases of finished wine. I am standing atop the catwalk at the top of the frame ruling over my loyal subjects.

Fruit processing

A 1/2 ton bin of Syrah waiting for the de-stemmer

Surprising news about what wine drinkers care about:

Grape growers and winemakers live and breathe farming and fermentation all year long, and many wine marketers wrongly assume that is what consumers want to hear about. But no, it appears that they are not very interested in how the wine is made or for that matter even how it’s grown. The top three important pieces of information consumers are after are 1) wine type, 2) flavor and taste, and 3) where the wine was produced. I suppose then a word to the wise – no more putting people to sleep droning on and on about farming methods, special blocks, blending trials, oak barrels, and so on.

Whhat wine customers are looking for?

Dysfunctional Family Winery construction news:

After 3 1/2 years of Sonoma County-required studies for a micro-winery Use Permit, we finally ‘turned some dirt’ and started digging test pits to reconfirm the building foundation requirements.

Geotech test pit 1

Excavator operator Jim Rong digging the test pit next to the old barn which will become the winery some day.

Geotech test pit 2

Don Whyte from PJC Geotechnical climbs into the test pit to study and report on the soil characteristics. We tossed in a Coors Light and a small dog and said “have fun down there”.

Happy winemaker:
IMG_1377

Underway with my 21st vintage. My happy face and the bags under my eyes is a regular gift from the long days of every harvest. That hat on my head, my local gym, well, I haven’t seen the place since March.

There goes my hero! – (watch the Foo Fighters song on You Tube)
DAW

Were you perhaps wondering who is this brave firefighter featured at the top of this post? His name is Dennis Wornick, and he is our middle child. He is a wildland firefighter with the U.S. Forest Service ‘Texas Canyon Hotshots’ based in LA. I am not certain where or when this picture was taken, but it was likely either on the Red Salmon Complex fire in or on the Dolan fire in Big Sur; and today his crew went into the Bobcat fire.

Wine label press check, Dysfunctional Family chickens, egg frittata, fresh tacos and recipes, sourdough, art, NorCal fires, and walnut slabs…

Wine label press check, Dysfunctional Family chickens, egg frittata, fresh tacos and recipes, sourdough, art, NorCal fires, and walnut slabs…

What would wine be without a label? (We do have a word for naked wine bottles…they’re called “shiners.”) Join me on a quick road trip as I travel to our wine label printer’s factory, MPI Label in Stockton Ca. After the wine team completes the brand identity, trademark, label design, and the required label approval from the federal government, the final artwork is sent to the label printer’s pre-press team. Then it’s time for the wine label press check:

Paper

Long before the wine label press check, the decision of which paper to use is critical – every option from bright white felt to creamy eggshell is available to the wine label designers.

Raw paper

Those are huge! After the paper type is selected, the process starts with palleted spools of 1-ton raw paper sitting on the press factory floor. 

Nunez 1

The press team will run a sample of our client’s label for the client’s rep (me) to approve, thus the term press check. Here, our client’s artwork, the Nunez Vineyards Napa Cabernet, is the approved ‘control’ label given to the press operator who must precisely match this artwork throughout the entire press run.

Sovare

And this press check proof is for another of our clients, the DeAcetis Family “Sovare,” a field blend of Sonoma Mountain Cabernet, Sangiovese, and Zin wine.

Salami label on spools

After running through the 1/4 mile long press, the label paper emerges as a continuous roll of almost-finished printed labels.

Video – watch the label printing on the press

Salami labels on roll

Whether it’s Safeway, Whole Foods, or Sonoma Market, food labels start with artwork that moves onto large rolls of paper and ends up here, as labels ready to apply to the package, in this case, Columbus Dry Salame.

Soap on spools

Here’s another example, in this case, many thousands of labels of a familiar brand of hand soap headed to Costco.

Soap

And a close-up of the hand soap label.

Bottling: after printing and processing, the labels make their way to the bottling line…

Mobile bottling filler

At the bottling line, new empty wine bottles are cleaned, ‘sparged’ with an inert food-grade gas which remove all oxygen, and then filled with wine.

Labels on bottles

After wine, cork, and capsule, the cut and spooled labels are applied to the wine bottles.

Video – of finished cases exit the bottling line

Palletized cases of labeled wine

Palletized and stretch-wrapped pallets of wine head to the chilled fulfillment warehouse, and eventually to your home! In 20 short months, from harvest to finished product, your deep dark inky red wine is ready for delivery.

In other news around Sonoma – chickens, frittata, tacos, fresh produce, recipes, sourdough, art, walnut trees, and more:

Kids in ‘school’

Neighborhood kids visit Hydeout Sonoma and the Dysfunctional Family chicken coop during a home-schooling exercise.

Chicken Olympics

On top of an alfalfa bale, Buff wins bronze, Orpington wins silver, and Henny Penny wins gold.

Fritatta

And the delicious result is a cooked-to-perfection low-fat high-protein zucchini frittata – try this recipe with some eggs and squash

Tacos!

My personal favorite place to buy fresh-made corn “Azteca style” tortillas. Use navigation to find it!

Heuvos Rancheros

Enjoying our homemade farm fresh tacos – brings a brief pause to the endless fires and virus isolation – here’s a good taco recipe

Summer produce

More mid-August produce from Hydeout Sonoma – this year’s various Zebra tomatoes are the clear winners – the green zebra is one this year’s favorites – learn more about heirloom green zebras

Hydeout Sonoma Produce

Hydeout Sonoma grew all the food in this photo…except one item. Can you guess? Where’s Waldo? (Yeh, it’s the watermelon). My favorite squash is the Pattypan. Small, sweet, few seeds, entirely edible with little waste – try growing some of your own Pattypans.

Sourdough

Oh no…but wait, oh yes… it’s the cliché shelter-in-place stay-at-home social-distancing no-hugging barely-risen amateur sourdough – try this super-easy sourdough recipe

But wait, there’s more…

CBW at SVMA

The Sonoma Valley Museum of Art launched a terrific new show, “california rocks’ just as the virus shut down Sonoma. This is a fantastic collection of photographs from many of the best rock shows in the Bay Area during the 70’s, from the Cow Palace, Winterland, Day-on-the-Green, and many more – see it online here: Sonoma Valley Museum of Art – ‘California Rocks”

Fires, again!
Napa fire

 Oh no, here we go again. Last time it was the wind and downed power lines, this time it was ferocious lighting strikes, a rarity in NorCal. This was the start of it, as viewed from Hydeout looking east over Arrowhead Mountain toward Napa Valley over the hill.

Fire

And a few days later…this is a view of the Hennessey / Soda Canyon LNU complex fire in Napa, as viewed around noon from the Hydeout in Sonoma.

80-year old Walnut trees harvested for fine furniture:
Walnut tree

A friend and neighbor down the street prepares to take down two huge and dying 80-year old Walnut trees…

Walnut upper

In a few short hours, the crew has the bulk of the tree on the ground. This piece was estimated to weigh in excess of 3 tons.

Walnut trunk

Large pieces of exotic Walnut will easily make in excess of $100,000 of furniture. These particular raw chunks will be slabbed on a huge band saw and dried for 3-5 years at my friend Evan Shively’s mill in Marshall – go to this website and watch this incredible drone video – Evan Shively’s famous wood mill in Marshall, called “Arborica”

 

Offset disc 1

This very heavy 20-disc hydraulic-ram implement is for sale. Reply with best offer, let’s make a deal!

Ken in a Barrel

Some weird naked cowboy in a wine barrel snuck into this blog post. Thank you artist, renaissance man, and good friend Jock McDonald – see his website here – https://www.jockmcdonald.com

Iconic Sebastiani vineyards returning to glory…

Iconic Sebastiani vineyards returning to glory…

Hydeout Sonoma was selected by one of the arms of the historic Sebastiani wine family to return two iconic vineyards to their former glory. But it almost takes a secret Sonoma decoder ring to explain the vaunted family history, players, vineyards, and wines. More on that later. Let’s start with the work in process…

“Los Liones” vineyard block: Hydeout Sonoma was tasked with the complete renovation of this famous vineyard. Here is an abbreviated one-year pictorial essay following the reborn “Los Liones” vineyard, from raw land to completed vineyard:

“Stone Fruit Square” block: We then cast our eyes on the equally iconic “Stone Fruit Square” vineyard just east of downtown Sonoma at the intersection of Lovall Valley Road and Gehricke Road. This 25-year old quadrilateral-trained Cabernet vineyard was once a part of the renowned ‘Cherryblock’ vineyard. Now, a piece of the famed ‘block’ has been segregated away and re-named “Stone Fruit Square” (this is August’s terrific play on words!). This fruit is also destined for the “Gehricke” ‘Upper Eastside’ label.

Now, the rest of the story…

Don and Nancy Sebastiani are the 3rd generation owners of the “Los Liones” vineyard. Their children, Donny, August, and Mia all have their hands in interesting wine country ventures. Fruit from the “Los Liones” vineyard once went into a small production red wine called Subterra.  Mia’s husband, Kendrick Coakley, along with his local friends, made a beautiful red wine from the “Los Liones” block. When 3Badge CFO Keith Casale handed me a bottle of Subterra, I opened it with some noteworthy Silicon Valley execs who have impeccable wine cred. They joined me in becoming immediate customers of Subterra.

But old age took down the original 1960’s era “Los Liones” vineyard and a replanting plan was set in motion last year (as you read about above). In parallel, we shifted the farming of the “Stone Fruit Square” vineyard from commercial mechanized farming to hand-cultivated farming. We intend to deliver deeper darker fruit as a result. August is the founder of 3Badge Beverage Corp. which is located in the former ‘firehouse’ at the corner of Broadway and Patten and the company “3Badge” is named in honor of family members who once held positions in the police and fire departments. Fruit from the “Los Liones” and “Stone Fruit Square” vineyard blocks will be combined under the Gehricke label as a ‘vineyard designate’ called “Upper East Side” (as both vineyards are located in the swanky upper eastside neighborhood of Sonoma town). 

Hydeout Sonoma will continue to develop and farm these iconic vineyard blocks. And we’ll do our best to bring forth fruit that will assure that the “Gehricke” ‘Upper East Side’ vineyard designates continue their iconic reputation.

Additional vineyard notes (for those who just can’t get enough technical info):

“Los Liones” vineyard:

  • Plant type – Ubervine from Novavine
  • Variety – Cabernet Sauvignon
  • Clone: VCR 198.1 (proprietary selection from Vivai Cooperativo Raucedo via Foundation Plant Material Services at UC Davis)
  • Rootstock: 110R (berlandieri x rupestris, medium vigor, loves hillside gravelly soils)
  • Vine architecture: bi-lateral cordon (moving toward cane-and-spur in year +/- 5)
  • Farming: 100% organic, irrigated during youth, moving toward deficit irrigation

“Stone Fruit Square” vineyard:

  • Planting – old school 1960’s plant canopy and spacing
  • Variety – Cabernet Sauvignon
  • Clones: Various
  • Rootstock: St George (‘terra rosa’ volcanic soil)
  • Vine architecture: quadrilateral cordon
  • Farming: 100% organic, deficit irrigated and/or dry farmed depending on the year
@gehrickewines 
#gehricke
#gehrickewines
A final thought: We are in a time of terrible upset in our great country. It seems as if everything is politicized and polarized. We at Hydeout Sonoma takes very seriously the issues we are all confronting. But our blog post is not the forum for otherwise welcome debate. Still, we hope for health, peace, and liberty for all.
Dysfunctional Family Winery: Shelter in Place Delivery

Dysfunctional Family Winery: Shelter in Place Delivery

What can a winemaker do to ease the shelter in place burden? Hand deliver wine, of course. Members of our growing ‘Dysfunctional Family’ wine community receive their bottles of wine, sometimes in a direct handoff, sometimes over the fence. This was in early April 2020 before masks and gloves! And it’s also a photo travelogue of sorts from around Sonoma. Enjoy:

In other ranch and grape news around Sonoma Valley…

Cherie with drone bee

Renowned beekeeper and Hydeout Sonoma neighbor Chere Pafford finds a large drone honey bee napping on our driveway. A drone is a male bee that is the product of an unfertilized egg. Drones have bigger eyes and lack stingers. They cannot help defend the hive and they do not have the body parts to collect pollen or nectar, so they cannot contribute to feeding the community. The drone’s only job is to mate with the queen. Link: Sonoma Honey Bees

Baby turkey chick 2

From the first clutch of wild turkey babies this season, we saw this one (and its 8 siblings) hiding in the brush under an olive tree waiting for its mother to return to collect them all. It’s not safe for them to wander around in the open while the Red Tail hawks are around. Link: all about wild turkeys

Sagrantino

Bud break at the Dysfunctional Family estate vineyard, just after mowing the yellow mustard which had gone to seed. We’ll be launching our ubiquitous Dysfunctional Family wines – a Sagrantino-based ‘Estate Reserve’ and the Sonoma Valley ‘Red Blend’ –  just as soon as the County lets us convert the old white barn into a functional winery. That story will be told in it’s entirety some day…

Client Steve R

Client and friend Steve R. brings out the big gun (his old but very well maintained Kubota with the rear excavator attachment) to help us locate an irrigation supply line in his vineyard. He’s growing Cab Franc and Merlot here on Sonoma Mountain. Steve’s “Octagon” Morning Mountainside label is only available directly from the estate.

Entertainment provided by Jock McDonald

Famed photographer and Sonoma friend Jock McDonald makes an appearance dressed as if there was end-of-the-virus party. But no, we were just social distancing. Thankfully, it didn’t end up like the pre-virus visit with Jock naked in the pool and the rest of us trying not to look! Hah. https://www.jockmcdonald.com

 

Sonoma Farm Life (in the time of Corona Virus)

Sonoma Farm Life (in the time of Corona Virus)

Sonoma farm life is explored, scroll through to be entertained, learn, and laugh…or just waste 10 minutes before your next ‘bored & working from home’ Corona virus zoom video conference.

Vineyard pruning in March

Vineyard unpruned vine

Here is an example of a grapevine waiting to be pruned. As a deciduous plant, it drops all of it’s leaves in winter and translocates carbs and nutrients from the woody shoots back into the roots. In spring, those nutrients push back into the new shoots supporting growth.

Vineyard pruner at work

Our beloved Emma, a world class grapevine pruner at work.

Vineyard canes and spurs tied to training wire

The pruned and tied vine. Note all the previous year’s wood has been removed (on the ground waiting for mowing into in-place compost), and only the ‘new wood’ has been tied horizontally to the training wire (the wire above the black drip hose). Picture this being done thousands of times per acre and you have some sense of the labor and expense of vineyard farming. Sonoma farm life

Gardening

beets onions

One of our raised beds – Beets in the foreground, red onion sets in the background, about 4 weeks from harvest, around April 10th.

little bunny foo foo

The bunnies have been reproducing especially rapidly this year. This baby here has possibly lost its mother and is temporarily hiding in this empty plant container till dark. Always interesting to follow which animal populations expand or shrink depending upon conditions. We’ve always had the usual gophers, deer, rabbit, and fox, and recently a family of weasels under the rock pile. Sonoma farm life

Rescuing a downed Red Tail Hawksadly this story doesn’t end well…

Red Tail at night

I was on a walk at dusk down by the Arroyo Seco creek and came upon an injured and very confused Red Tail Hawk. Called my friend Chris Melanćon, a trained falconer, and later that evening we captured and boxed the bird to keep it safe and warm overnight.

Red Tail weighing

The following morning we brought it to the Bird Rescue Center in Santa Rose were it was checked into the system, assigned a number, and weighed.

Red Tail closeup head

Skilled nurses carefully checked the health and condition.

Red Tail wing span

And checked all it’s vitals, including wings of course.

Red Tail talons

You can see these raptors have quite the extended reach and very sharp claws to grab their prey while in flight.

Red tail Bird Rescue Sign

Sadly, our bird survived only a few days at the Rescue Center. Apparently it had suffered a neurologic injury and just could not pull through. We did our best. Nature at work. Sonoma farm life

Willow tree cuttings

willow cuttings

Found myself in Healdsburg on a bike ride and met up with a fellow winemaker who has a rare yellow-barked willow. Genus Salix. Could not pass up the chance to fill my backpack with cuttings which in the case of all willows are quite easily transplanted.

willow

These willow cuttings are soaking before going into the ground. Willows will sprout roots from almost any woody cutting. They are fast growers too. The roots are very invasive so it’s a bad idea to plant them near pipes and sidewalks. But they are an excellent plant almost anywhere else for instant shade. And other plants and trees will naturally fill in under them as the willows age-out and die-off later.

Mowing the native grasses

Before mowing

Before: This is a good time of year to give the grasses and forbs (pasture) a quick haircut.

after mowing

After: The first cut-pass with my old 1950’s Mott flail mower mounted onto the PTO of our Kubota tractor. The smell of the cut grass is intoxicating. I do this to create a dry and comfortable walking path out in the pastures, leaving the remainder to grow high in the spring.

fence line

This is view of our north fence line getting ready to mow.

The old Mott flail mower occasionally enters a complaint!

old bearing

The flail mower takes a real beating. After some heavy use, on occasion a bearing will burn out. You can see here that the bearings are completely gone. Had to learn how to replace these. I’ve heard many stories of grass fires starting when the bearing fails and the red-hot ball-bearings fly out on to dry grass. It’s best to be safe and mow while the grass is still green.

new bearing

About to install this new bearing mount on the cutting shaft. $250 and 2 hours later.

Distilling wine into ethanol to make grape-based Brandy and Grappa

Still 1

This is a view of the copper column still I’ve been using to craft Brandy and Grappa from our clients grape pomace.

Still 2

Start off with a half-ton of what’s left in the wine press after pressing, called pomace, and end up after distilling with several gallons of 186 proof pure distilled ethanol. Then that is diluted back with pure water to reach the targeted brandy/grappa alcohol level 35% to 60% by volume (ABV). Then it’s aged in oak or whisky barrels or flavored with fruit as desired. And then bottled and labeled. The story of grappa.

Chickens and Auto Solar Chicken Door

chicken incubator

Last month I added eleven new chicks seen here in the incubator. Just add chicks, water, and food, and presto…in about 21 weeks all those hens will be laying 2 eggs every 3 days!

Auto chicken door

This is an automatic chicken door. How does it work? A solar panel (on the coop roof, not in view) charges a 12v battery (top left of the white door), the battery operates the motor (top right of door), and a light sensor (not in view) opens the door at first light and closes it a dark. There is also a ‘last chance’ feature where the door re-opens for one minute 5 minutes after dark. The chickens quickly adjust to the routine and religiously get themselves inside before the door closes for the second time at dusk. You can find this excellent equipment at Chicken Doors. Sonoma farm life

Mulching

wood chips

Local tree trimming companies are more than happy to have a free place to drop off chipped tree mulch. This pile represents about 20 truckloads. This material is very useful around the farm; especially with roses and plants that require moist soil and little weed competition.

Mustard blooms

Mustard

In one of our client vineyards, a tree fell in the recent strong winds, so we got out the chainsaws and went at it. In the background you can see a new Cabernet vineyard block we planted last Fall, and the mustard coming up nicely.

Hot air ballooning

hot air balloon

In Sonoma, you can look up pretty much any early morning and see the tourists enjoying their hot air ballon rides. The air is very still and it’s pretty cold out too. That’s why they keep the coffee hot! This one, the well-recognized ‘red tulips’, is from Napa Valley Balloons.

The end of the day on the farm

winter full moon

The sun begins to set on another day on the farm, as the low clouds glow and the full moon rises.

end of day

It’s a real treat to have friends over for an authentic wood fire, only possible on cold damp winter nights, and no matter what, we use the spark arrester. Why? Everyone in Sonoma is rightfully fearful of loose sparks starting a wild fire.

Just for fun: The biggest grape and wine convention in the United States, the Unified Grape and Wine Symposium

Symposium entrance

The Unified Symposium attracts wine industry professionals from around the world.

Wine Business Monthly

One of the most popular trade magazines in our industry, Wine Business Monthly always has an informative booth. Assistant Editor Stacy Briscoe welcomes me to the show. This is also the ‘go-to’ website for all things grapes and wine – buy/sell grapes or bulk wine, learn about the latest trends, etc.

Symposium floor

The convention covers every imaginable aspect – from vineyard farming tools to heavy equipment, to the latest in drone-applied sprays. And in wine, everything from bottles, corks, and capsules, to pumps and valves, and laboratory testing.

Mechanical Harvester

One of my favorite activities each year is to visit the ‘large equipment’ yard. I’ll never have a use for this million-dollar computer-controlled self-propelled mechanical harvester/sorter…but it’s really interesting to stand next to it and walk around (and inside). This behemoth can harvest upwards of 25 tons an hour, with one operator! Equal to many dozens of laborers and people-hours.